13 Comments
Mar 8, 2023Liked by Will Dowd

Loved this one. Grace and forgiveness - hopefully that is what people will choose.

That is my favorite quote of Einstein’s, and I believe it touches on what is highly important for all human beings - to be inclusive, compassionate and acknowledge we are all in this together.

I have wanted so much to be perceived as a good person that it can scare me to think someone else might think I’ve done something bad or wrong. But unfortunately, or fortunately maybe, all humans are flawed, it isn’t possible to be absolutely without fault.

I’m not judging Einstein too harshly for his private thoughts. I think his actions are ultimately what matters. As a traveler I think it can be expected that upon seeing new cultures you might have an initial negative reaction, but I don’t imagine he was behaving in a way towards those people that was harmful to them. But i also have no idea.

Maybe with that quantum computer, people will realize that we can stop pointing the finger at others and accept that we are all a work in progress. And maybe people will start being more honest about their true feelings and will be liberated. What I want most is for people to be real.

Expand full comment
author

Beautifully said, Camilla. That's a very interesting thought—that radical exposure will lead to people being more real. I think there's something to that...

Expand full comment
Mar 9, 2023Liked by Will Dowd

"With his scientific and philanthropic bona fides beyond doubt, the only real question about Einstein was whether his mane of white hair was so frizzy because he’d managed to plug directly into an electrical socket of cosmic wisdom or because, like some saint living in the rugged wilderness of his own vast brilliance, he’d grown an untamable, iridescent halo."

Brilliant!

"Mutually assured forgiveness", also a lovely turn of phrase. I approve, that sounds like a sure fire way to make it through.

Expand full comment
author

Charles, thank you very much. So glad that we're on the same quantum wavelength.

Expand full comment

Oh, to find a wormhole and redo some things in life would be so divine...I think. Until then, I will be more careful what I type, think, and say. It's a human conundrum that we have to actually work to be our best ourselves rather than default to the shadow stuff. And thank you for the reminder to remember to burn my paper diaries prior to my leaving this existence.

Expand full comment
author

Such a strange thing to know that Emily Dickinson, Franz Kafka and others were adamant that their work be posthumously burned, and that when we read their writing, we're benefiting from the betrayals of their literary executors. What's the lesson: burn everything ourselves or hope that future readers will find something of value in the dross of our imperfect leavings?

Expand full comment

Everyone is inherently good. Emerson explains, regardless of our perceived flaws--we’re all being ushered toward the good.

So no matter if a computer knows our every move, it will be for the preservation of consciousness. We are toolmakers who invent to keep the fire within alive.

In the meantime, while we anticipate singularity, folks keep justifying and signaling how people are inherently bad or withholding truth as a result of reading a dead man’s private journal from the 1920/. Einstein. A neurodivergent, world-renowned mathematician and inventor.

Not even a dead man is safe from judgement in the light of error.

Insightful offering.

Expand full comment
author

Thank you very much for reading, William. I really appreciate your thoughts here.

Expand full comment

You’re welcome, Will. God bless.

Expand full comment

Or, even worse, no one will bother to look up what you said/wrote/journaled... :)

Expand full comment
author

Devastating!

Expand full comment

Beautiful as always, Will.

Expand full comment
author

Thanks so much, Joan.

Expand full comment